2014/06/3ac9c_singing_lessons_default

Beginners How to Sing a High Note | Singing Lessons

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18 thoughts on “Beginners How to Sing a High Note | Singing Lessons”

  1. Amy Lee lead singer of Evanescence does this warm-up lol i really like this
    warm-up it’s funny and i think it does work after you do it a couple of
    times. What i suggest is before you go into harder more belting songs
    warm-up on some songs at your range that is lighter on your voice and easy
    for you to do, sing 2 or 3 of them and then work up to louder more heavy
    duty songs, like i can sing my immortal great as it’s more smoother and has
    that AHHHHhhhhhhh…. sort of movement stated in this warm-up (the band
    version you want), and you should be singing smoother when it gets to
    harder songs and higher notes. If your lower or higher than me though find
    one that is as smoother and easy to warm up.

  2. Dynamic range building exercises so you will be able to quickly expand your range and sing those higher notes with ease.

  3. to make it simpler for all of you: it’s mix voice – she first started
    singing the high note in head voice (2:41) then did the mix voice at (3:16)
    – just remove the air when using head voice or pretend that you’re making a
    ambulance siren sound and viola – mix voice – don’t focus on being loud –
    look at the great belters out there, they are at ease with their high notes
    cause they mix, if the vocal placement is correct – volume and tone will
    come along with it too, so don’t make much effort on being loud and
    powerful, rather focus on hitting the notes without strain by mixing – the
    vocal power will come naturally that way if you do so. 

  4. I started singing when I was 15 and I had NO range. I was singing from A3
    to C5. I progressed a lot over the years by expanding myself. I can cover
    Soprano, Alto and Tenor (C3 to Eb6).

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